Here I blog about writing, editing, reading, books, submissions, freelancing, getting published (and rejected), journalism, revisions, life after the MFA, teaching writing, and living the writer's life. Welcome. BUT -- if you are a writer: Write first, read blogs second.




Wednesday, November 18, 2009

The Story Behind the Essay

So where did that essay come from, what craft decisions were made along the way, and how did its eventual form evolve? These were the questions I attempted to answer yesterday in a guest post on Erika Dreifus's writing blog. The essay I wrote was "42 Lies About My Child," which was a winner recently in the 31 Hours Contest. The essay's form is unusual, and begins like this:

But he's such a good baby. But he's floppy and never comfortable.
He's developing at his own pace. He's lagging behind.
Stop reading books. Books are often right.
So what if he doesn't point? Pointing is a developmental milestone.


To read the rest of the piece on the contest site, click here. And to get my take on the story behind the essay, click here.

2 comments:

2KoP said...

I loved both your winning essay and the piece about the writing process that got you there. As a mom of a special needs boy (my twins were born at 24 weeks), your prose poem hit home. For 18 years, I've been wanting to write a memoir about our experience.

Have you read Vicki Forman's poignant, honest memoir about her preemie twins? It's called This Lovely Life. It's not to be missed, especially for writers of creative nonfiction.

Lisa Romeo said...

Thank you for those kind words.

I loved Vicki Forman's book. She did a guest post here last winter when she was knee deep in the process of final edits of her book's galleys and described that process.

And, she's going to make a return appearance in a few weeks w/another great guest post.