Friday, May 13, 2016

Friday Fridge Clean-Out: Links for Writers -- May 13, 2016 Edition

>The new issue of Brevity is live, and with it, a craft essay from Amye Archer on objectivity in memoir, including this wise tip about what happens when we revise and revise to uncover the full story, not just our own (perhaps angry) version: "With each retelling of the story, we pull the lens further and further away from our scene, until the full landscape of our lives – both sides of the story – become visible to the reader."

> I was incensed but not the tiniest bit surprised when a publisher more or less admitted, that a writer's -- no let's be clear, a female writer's -- facial appearance and weight negatively affect offers and advances. At The Toast, Mallory Ortberg breaks it down. (Bottom line: beware if you're "hard to look at.")


>At LitHub, Danielle Dutton has some words"On Terrible Writing Advice from Famous Writers." 

>Sorry to see that hybrid publisher Booktrope has closed shop.

>The fabulously helpful Trish Hopkinson offers useful advice, resources, and submission options for previously published work.


> I've, mentioned Poetry Has Value here before, and now I've discovered (thanks, Erika Dreifus), The Whole Megillah, where writer Barbara Krasner is sharing her submission/rejection/payment/investment stats for multiple genres. (And she's inviting other writers to join her in sharing their own stats.


>Finally, a tip I often give about successfully placing short, personal essays--especially those keyed to a timely season or event--is to zig when others zag. That's what I did last week, when the ultra-sentimental Mother's Day pieces were piling up, and I thought RoleReboot might like my very different idea about that holiday.



Have a great weekend!

3 comments:

trishhopkinson.com said...

Great list! Thanks for including me! Lots of wonderful stuff here.

Louisa said...

Lisa, I enjoyed your Mother's Day piece! Does Role Reboot pay for freelance essays?

Lisa Romeo said...

Thanks for reading, @Louisa. No, that one is not a paying market.